Continent Malaysia

Continents

Why Travel Malaysia?

Malaysia is a Southeast Asian country occupying parts of the Malay Peninsula and the island of Borneo. It's known for its beaches, rainforests and mix of Malay, Chinese, Indian and European cultural influences. The capital, Kuala Lumpur, is home to colonial buildings, busy shopping districts such as Bukit Bintang and skyscrapers such as the iconic, 451m-tall Petronas Twin Towers. If countries were awarded for diversity, Malaysia would top first place. Not only is Malaysia a melting pot of ethnic cultures, but it is also a blend of many different customs, cuisines and religions all coexisting peacefully together. From large island groups to mountains, fertile highlands and tropical rainforest, the country’s geography is every bit as diverse. What’s more, Malaysia is a unique country in that is divided into two main landmasses. West Malaysia occupies the southern half of a peninsula shared with Thailand, while across the South China Sea is East Malaysia, situated on the Borneo island. This overview of the best places to visit in Malaysia concentrates on its cultural, historic and natural attractions. Kota Bharu Often used as a stopover by many travelers visiting the beautiful Perhentian Islands, Kota Bharu offers its own unique charm, attractions, shopping and cuisine. Located in Peninsular Malaysia near the Thailand border, Kota Bharu is the capital of the Kelantan State. Much of Kota Bharu life revolves around the city’s bustling marketplaces of which the Central Market is the largest. Surrounded by coffee shops and busy streets dotted with old trishaws, the Central Market is teeming in local women working food stands and selling colorful fruits and vegetables. Cameron Highlands Providing a cool escape from the heat of the lowlands, the Cameron Highlands in the Titiwangsa Mountains are one of Malaysia’s oldest tourist destinations. Developed with an English garden charm, this beautiful tableland offers lush scenery, forests, lakes, wildlife and outdoor recreation. As Malaysia’s chief tea and flower producer, the Cameron Highlands also abounds in sprawling tea plantations and colorful flower farms. Many of these establishments are open to the public. Several pictorial golf courses are available for golfers. Kota Kinabalu The capital of the Sabah State in Malaysian Borneo, Kota Kinabalu is a fast-growing tourist destination due to its close proximity to tropical islands, rainforests, wildlife refuges, national parks and Malaysia’s tallest peak, Mount Kinabalu. Commonly called KK by locals, Kota Kinabalu has a small city center, boasting a number of landmarks, memorials and an observatory, which offers splendid views of the city. Just minutes from the city, the Tunku Abdul Rahman Park features five small islands that are ideal for snorkeling, diving and swimming. Kuching The largest city on Borneo Island, Kuching is a popular base for exploring Borneo’s rainforest and the state of Sarawak. However, Kuching offers plenty for tourists to see and do during their stay, from sightseeing historic landmarks to bustling markets and outdoor recreation. The city is situated on the banks of the Sarawak River with a beautifully landscaped waterfront offering views of historic landmarks such as Fort Margherita and Astana palace. Distinct for its umbrella-shaped roof, the Kuching Civic Center contains a planetarium and a viewing platform presenting outstanding aerial views. Penang Located in the Strait of Malacca off West Malaysia’s northwestern coast, Penang Island is a popular tourist destination due to its historic George Town and rich culinary diversity. Its position along one of the world’s most traveled shipping routes has infused Penang with a colorful array of cultures, architecture and cuisine. No visit to Penang would be complete without a trishaw ride or walk around the island’s capital city, George Town, to see its British colonial architecture and historic Chinese and Indian temples. Langkawi Langkawi is the main island of a group of 99, which form the archipelago with the same name. Often overlooked, especially by Western tourists, in favor of the better-known Thai islands and Singapore, Langkawi offers breathtaking scenery with its beautiful beaches, fine sand, crystal-clear water and coastal mangrove swamps. The inland areas are no less striking; the tropical jungles are thick with luxuriant vegetation and rich in fauna (the island’s name itself indicates an eagle with characteristic reddish feathers), and will impress nature lovers looking for a pristine, largely untouched rainforest. Taman Negara With an extension of over 4,000 square kilometers, the national park of Taman Negara straddles three Malaysian states, and is home to many species of endangered animals, such as the Malayan tiger, the crab-eating macaque and the Asian elephant. The area is so vast, however, that it’s rare to catch the sight of any of the big animals. But this should not discourage anyone from visiting the park, as many other surprises await. Bird watching, excursions through the dense jungles of the park, and the night walks, where the lack of light brings out buzzing insects, are particularly thrilling. The rainforest can also be viewed from above the treetops while trekking down the 530-meter-long suspended Canopy Walkway. Kuala Lumpur Less than 200 year ago, Kuala Lumpur was just a quiet tin-mining town in West Malaysia. Today, this same sleepy village has flourished into the country’s federal capital and largest metropolis. Commonly called KL by locals, this vibrant city is a cultural melting pot, noted for its impressive skyscrapers and buzzing scenes of shopping and dining. KL doesn’t really have a city center but rather several hubs of activity. The former colonial district features distinctive architecture and the pleasant Merdeka Square. Chinatown is a busy tourist hub while the Golden Triangle presents the city’s modern face, with the famous Petronas Towers as its most striking building. Batu Caves One of Malaysia’s national treasures and holiest Hindu sites, this complex of giant limestone caves, just 13km north of KL, houses temples that have been drawing pilgrims for more than 120 years. The American naturalist William Hornaday is credited with discovering the caves in 1878, though they were known to Chinese settlers (who collected guano) and, of coLangkawi is the main island of a group of 99, which form the archipelago with the same name. Often overlooked, especially by Western tourists, in favor of the better-known Thai islands and Singapore, Langkawi offers breathtaking scenery with its beautiful beaches, fine sand, crystal-clear water and coastal mangrove swamps. The inland areas are no less striking; the tropical jungles are thick with luxuriant vegetation and rich in fauna (the island’s name itself indicates an eagle with characteristic reddish feathers), and will impress nature lovers looking for a pristine, largely untouched rainforest.urse, the local indigenous peoples. Note that each cave has a different admission price – the Temple Cave is free – and opening hours vary. Central Market Kuala Lumpur’s Central Market is a bustling, colorful market packed with stalls. The stalls are grouped in lorongs (lanes) based on the main ethnic races in Malaysia (most notably, Malay, Chinese and Indian), and sell a myriad handmade crafts, from clothes to wooden carvings and jewelry to batik fabrics; all alongside plenty of street food options. The market also contains the Annexe, a space reserved for art galleries showcasing the work of local artists. Petronas Twin Towers In a country with a rich and beautiful natural landscape, Kuala Lumpur’s Petronas Twin Towers stand out as an unusual example of Malaysia’s urban design excellence. Designed by American architecture star César Pelli and officially inaugurated in 1999, the towers were the tallest buildings in the world until 2004. Each rises to a little over 450 meters from ground level, and with 88 floors of offices, the towers’ most impressive feature is the double-decker bridge that connects them on the 41st and 42nd floors. From the bridge, at 170 meters above ground, visitors can enjoy a spectacular view of the city below their feet. Sunway Lagoon Enjoy over 80 attractions spread across 36 hectares (88 acres) at Sunway Lagoon. Opened in 1997, the theme park was greatly expanded in 2008 to include an interactive wildlife park and a huge man-made surfing beach. The "scare" area features audio-visual effects and live actors creating a spooky atmosphere appropriate for all ages. With games of skill and puzzles along with traditional roller-coasters and water rides, you'll find something to get your mind and heart racing. K L Bird Park Discover the diversity of Malaysia's avian life at KL Bird Park. See 200 species of bird in their natural habitat across 8.5 hectares (20.9 acres) of well-maintained land, rich in plant life and studded with attractive water features. The park enjoys huge popularity among seasoned birdwatchers, scientists, and nature-lovers, providing an enclosed yet expansive natural environment in which to spot the impressive numbers of feathered creatures that make their home there. Spot hornbills, hawk eagles, ostriches, and Mandarin ducks during your visit, enjoy a feeding-time demonstration with flamingoes and birds of prey, and learn about the park's breeding program at the incubation room and nursery. Berjaya Time Square Theme Park, Kuala Lumpur THEME PARK WATER / AMUSEMENT PARK Enjoy thrilling rides in any weather at Berjaya Time Square Theme Park, the second largest indoor theme park in Asia. Ride the looping roller coaster and other exhilarating fairground attractions, play the latest arcade games, drive bumper cars, and catch a movie or two at the onsite theater. The theme park is located inside a 48-storey building, which also houses a shopping mall and many eateries. Don't throw away your entry wristband, as you can use it to re-enter the theme park throughout the day.

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